All documents, logos, photos and writing copyright to Vimaala, 2019. You should consult with your GP before starting any diet, exercise or supplement program - all information provided by Vimaala is purely for advice and educational purposes and should not replace medical advice. You undertake this advice at your own risk. 
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When to see a Nutritionist

September 23, 2017

 

 

 

After many years of being overweight, I decided to make a change and do something good for my body. I started going to the gym, I changed my diet and went vegan, and I started practising yoga again after a  few years out. When I first went vegan, I went to see a private dietician, just to check I was getting everything I needed. I'd done a fair amount of research, as I wanted to make sure I was having a healthy diet, but I just wanted some reassurance that I was on the right path.

 

The dietician I went to see had obviously never come across a vegan before (this was in 2008 not 1968!) and struggled with the advice she gave me - she offered me yoghurt and fish. As a vegan, I choose not to consume, wear or use anything that contains animal products, or have been tested on animals. So yoghurt and fish went out the window.

 

I went away feeling disappointed, and like I'd wasted my money! And I figured if I feel like this, surely other people do too? So I decided I wanted to further my training and enrol on a course so that I could help myself as well as others. 

 

A dietician is more scientific, whereas a nutritionist, or nutritional therapist, is more of a holistic therapist. Unfortunately this means that the title 'nutritionist' is not protected or regulated by law, whereas a dietician needs a certified degree. Therefore, when choosing a nutritionist, it is always important to check they are registered with an association that confirms their qualification. Anyone can call themselves a nutritionist, but the governing bodies ensure that accepted members have relevant and up to date qualifications from approved schools of knowledge. Unfortunately at the moment, there are lots of people selling supplements, protein powders and 'nutrition' products calling themselves nutritionists - an example of where the regulations need to be stricter. 

 

 

So what does a qualified nutritionist do?

 

Weight loss or weight gain - if you're trying to lose or gain weight, I can help. Before the appointment, I will ask you to fill in a food diary so I have an idea of your normal diet, then during the consultation we will discuss this further and put a plan in place for you to reach your goals.

 

Sports nutrition - if you are very active, you need to make sure you're eating the right things to for optimum performance. I can help put together a plan to achieve this.

 

Change of diet - if you're changing to a vegan or vegetarian diet, welcome! As a veggie of over 15 years and a vegan of over 7, I know how hard it can be to adapt and adjust. It's really important to make sure you're getting the right nutrients and not just living on beans on toast! 

 

Allergies / Intolerances - If you've been diagnosed with an allergy or intolerance, it can be hard to work out what to eat! Years of eating habits can be hard to break, so together we can work out the best diet for you.

 

Minor symptoms / bodily issues - feeling tired all the time, sluggish, or struggling with IBS? This can all be put down to a diet that's not working properly for you, but it doesn't have to be that way! 

 

If you have any further questions, or would like to book an appointment, contact me! I consult throughout Christchurch, Ringwood, Fordingbridge and surrounding areas. 

 

 

 

 

 

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